What ARE they looking at?

While looking through photos, I happened upon this one taken of Pimmie and I up on Grimselpass in Switzerland.  I have no idea what we were looking at, or why it was so captivating that both of us were locked in our gaze so deeply that we didn’t notice the attacking dinosaur.

 

Dino Attack!

Dino Attack!

 

 

Perhaps we were simply reflecting on how lucky we were to be riding around this stuff:

 

Tight Squeeze – 19 of 29

While travelling in Europe you learn quickly how fortunate we are in the states to have wide roadways – this photo was captured on our way along the eastern coast of Lake Como on our way to the Bellagio/Varenna ferry.  After a few days you get used to it, but you never know which blind corner will present you with an extremely tight fit.

 

Fuzzy squeezes through on her way to Varenna

Fuzzy squeezes through on her way to Varenna

 

 

 

This post is part of a series pioneered by fuzzygalore.com, we are trying to post a moto picture every day for February!  Can you do 29 in 29?!

A Yeti is caught on film! 12 of 29

Today’s photo brings us proof of the elusive Yeti  - caught on film while photographing our friend Pimmie up on Passo Rombo -Timmelsjoch in the Alps.

 

Timmelsjoch Yeti
Timmelsjoch Yeti

 

 

This post is part of a series pioneered by fuzzygalore.com, we are trying to post a moto picture every day for February!  Can you do 29 in 29?!

Riding the Alps – The San Bernardino Pass

The San Bernardino Pass was definitely one of my favorites. Maybe my favorite all around.

We snaked our way up and down the pass after stopping at a small grocery in the town of Splugen.

Water and a snack in Splugen

Water and a snack in Splugen

The way the road is laid out, the quality of the pavement (and the color, which made it very easy to read), the varying landscapes and shift in elevation made for an amazing ride. IIRC (and I say that loosely, some of the passes are blending together in my memory and I find it hard to separate some parts from others), the front side climbed up the face of the mountain, surrounding by bright green grass and a steep set of corners etched into the edge of the mountain. The lush grasses and blue skies added an amazing colorful contrast to the grey snake of pavement – it was absolutely beautiful.

San Bernardino Pass

San Bernardino Pass

The San Bernardino Pass

The San Bernardino Pass

At the top is a small lake and restaurant, much like many of the other passes. We saw a few guys milling around a couple of new Multistradas, with camera crew and photogs in tow – THAT must be a horrible job, being FORCED to test bikes on those roads.

Restaurant at the top of San Bernardino

Restaurant at the top of San Bernardino

At the top of the San Bernardino Pass

At the top of the San Bernardino Pass

Coming down the back side (to us), the road opened up into a racetrack with more fantastic elevation changes and what appeared to be a missile silo (Pimmie later informed me that I was an idiot, and that the silo was actually one of the vent tubes bringing fresh air to the San Bernardino Tunnel found deep below us). Sheesh.

San Bernardino becomes a racetrack

San Bernardino becomes a racetrack

Pimmie and I on San Bernardino

Pimmie and I on San Bernardino

Me and My Sweet, Mademoiselle Fuzzy Galore

Me and My Sweet, Mademoiselle Fuzzy Galore

Riding the Alps – Some quick lessons

Once we left Como on the way up to Bellagio, we immediately learned an important lesson about roads over in Italy – sometimes they aren’t very wide.  Often, you are sharing road space with oncoming traffic in what we would consider a narrow one-way street in the States.   At times the road tightens with little warning, where you can come around a blind turn and suddenly realize there’s just enough room for 1 car to make it through, and you are facing-off with a large metro bus coming in the opposite direction.   Once you’ve spent a little time travelling it becomes a lot more commonplace, but I can say that the first few times it happens it’s rather surprising.

And tunnels.  Tunnels everywhere (which makes sense, sometimes it’s much easier to go through the mountain than around it), and there are tons of mountains (which is why we went in the first place :) ).  Some are lined with concrete, lighted, etc – others are simply holes blown out of the mountain without lighting.  With turns.  Inside.  Hairpins.  In the dark.  Sometimes they’ll punch out some windows through the rock, which offer small one-second vistas as you meander through the tunnel.  They were all very different, and pretty amazing.

I put together a quick vid of some tunnels, hairpins and tight squeezes we found early on in the trip:

You can also find yourself sharing the road with, shall we say, more free-thinking vehicles, some of which might even decide to eat your tailbag if you aren’t paying attention…